Nov. 1st, 2014

brightrosefox: (Default)
https://adiaryofamom.wordpress.com/2013/03/21/hate/

"In one of my favorite posts about identity-first language, Zoe at Illusion of Competence writes the following:

I was at a conference last summer at which Ari Ne’eman gave an introductory speech, and it fell to him to explain why ASAN uses identity-first language. One of the things he said, which I really liked, was “If I’m on a flight and the airline loses my luggage, I don’t arrive without my autism.”

No matter what our view of autism’s origins, I think we can agree that it isn’t an appendage that can be taken on and off at will. It travels with our kids. IN our kids. As PART of our kids. And as such, it’s simply not reasonable to expect them to understand that we loathe autism but we don’t loathe them. Or that we hate this thing that afflicts them, but they shouldn’t hate themselves. Because even if we could get them to understand the difference intellectually, we’d be hard-pressed to get them to FEEL the distinction. And after the other night (and last night again and this morning again while Katie was still coughing and Brooke was still screaming), I was convinced that if we continue to tell these kids, through our words (to them or in front of them) or our actions, that we hate / fear autism, we are teaching them to hate / fear / pity themselves for having it. People do not separate themselves from what they have / how they act / what they feel / how they experience the world. And we as a society don’t either.

For the love of God, Katie had a COUGH – something temporary and fleeting. Something that will, God willing, be gone in a matter of DAYS. A cough – not the filter through which she tastes, sees, smells, hears, touches and perceives everything in her world. Yet because Brooke hated the cough, Katie’s entire identity became conflated with it. Driving with Katie, talking about how she felt, the implications of the moment rushed over me. And the weight of those implications was almost unbearable.

If we keep FIGHTING autism, HATING autism, FEARING autism, talking about the UTTER HAVOC that autism wreaks on us and our families, we will end up with a generation of children who have learned to hate themselves – or who, at the very least, hate things about themselves upon which they have no control or that, if they can control, they do at tremendous cost to their sense of well-being and self-esteem."

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