brightrosefox: (Default)
This is the greatest.
http://yoganonymous.com/watch-ultra-spiritual/

Good news: Apparently, most of this small weight gain is actual muscle. Who knew.
Annoying news: Everything hurts in such a very specific way everywhere that most forms of exercise make it all worse. The only things that seem to make it better are isometrics and mild qi gong and a few basic Pilates-style moves... sooo, physical therapy with a spiritual bent?

Also, I still have a stress reaction to even the idea of "doing yoga for pain". None of my doctors are surprised. Plus, the physical therapist suggested some lovely snarky replies to "Have you tried yoga for your pain?" - my favorite is still "Well, yoga tastes like artificial banana, and I hate artificial banana flavor, so I don't want any yoga, thanks." Second favorite is "Nah, I'm still trying that floating Jedi thing in the swamps. I'd rather take the Dark Side with the cookies."
Seriously. Don't yoga push me. I did try it, it was painful, I found other things.

Now I feel like mimicking that scene where Bart draws a picture of Flanders and chases Homer around with it yelling "Howdily doodily! Howdily doodily? HOWDILY DOODILY?" Luckily, I haven't been pushed in a while, and the last few times, I remained calm and cool, because I am still fucking awesome.

Addendum:
Also, it's really interesting: I am totally fine with basic yoga, with flow yoga, with restorative yoga. But it is the way people talk about it as though it helps everyone heal everything? That is what I gripe so much about. Maybe some poses will help ease cerebral palsy issues, fibromyalgia issues, joint issues. Maybe. For some disabled folks. But if I say something like "No, thank you, I've tried that, it was too painful, it made things worse, and I have found other exercises that help me," I expect people to, if not back off, then at least acknowledge my reasons. The actual fact that many pushers have brushed off my reasons and kept pushing is what makes me want to slap them with their yoga mats. So when I talk about an exercise by calling it a name that is also the name of a yoga pose, please please do not assume I have taken up yoga. It's just that "Warrior Pose" is far simpler than having to describe the whole thing.
Comments:
Anna Sirén: Yoga? Us? Really? ...?
Joanna Capello Paul: LOL, it is to laugh. But by gods, people love to try.
Anna Sirén: Jesus, I can't imagine you with your ankles behind your ears, and that's not an insult.
Joanna Capello Paul: OMG ow. Ow ow ow OW.
Joanna Capello Paul: I'm just glad other CP folks get it. I don't know what's so particularly special about yoga, but it's become so elitist in many ways. And if I say I'm "doing Child's Pose" or something, I feel like I need to add "not actual yoga because that is painful" because just because it's a stretching exercise doesn't mean it's a yoga pose.
Cara Liebowitz: When a teacher who knows how to handle Ceeps is doing it, yoga can be nice. *coughcough* Kara T. Billingham. Yoga at crip camp was great fun, if painful.
Joanna Capello Paul: My mom teaches a certain type of yoga to seniors in Southampton sometimes, and the moves are so simple they're barely even yoga. What bothers me really is this culture of yoga-ier than thou elitism, and gods forbid I perform a "yoga style type pose" that is not yoga.
Cara Liebowitz: I wonder if Kara and your mom know each other. Next time you're in the Hamptons, stop by The Yoga House, LLC and ask for Kara, tell her you know me. One of my favorite things about Kara's yoga was that she encouraged us to laugh if we wanted to.
Joanna Capello Paul: Hmm. I'll ask my mom! Have you spoken with Kara lately?
Joanna Capello Paul: *looking at website* Well, it's good that she teaches Kripalu. My parents' basement tenant, who is a massage therapist, is a certified Kripalu teacher.
Cara Liebowitz: We speak every so often here on Facebook, last I saw her was over the summer. She is wonderful, wonderful, wonderful and so is her husband. Two very influential people in my life.
Joanna Capello Paul: I haven't been through Hampton Bays in a long time, but I do recognize that sign and building. I have a feeling that Kara and my mom have run in similar circles.
Melissa Boyer O'Doyle: I'd rather take the Dark Side with the cookies.
Heather Stover: I do vinyasa flow yoga and restorative yoga. It helps. With some things. It is not some magic cure for everything. If you're not into it people should leave you alone, your yogi wouldn't want you there with any less then a willing mind and heart.
Heather Stover: Gentle yoga classes are the bomb. I hate elitist yoga snobs.
Mad Miriam: You know you might just get people to back down more quickly by simply sating that you have a very satisfying home practice, thank you very much.
Joanna Capello Paul: ...except that when they keep nudging and insisting, I tend to feel backed into a corner, and I start snarling. I'm a very peaceful person. But I am also shy and isolated. I really don't like being pushed.
Mad Miriam: If your agreeing why are they still nudging and insisting?
Joanna Capello Paul: I really wish I knew. People are very odd.
Mad Miriam: I'll say. I'm sorry, I for one do not push cause well I know you have met the practice where you are at and since yoga means union isn't that the fucking point anyhow?
Joanna Capello Paul: Agreed. That's why I am so upset and pissed off when people don't seem to understand the whole damn point. Union is about, y'know, respecting people's choices. The fact that there ARE yoga practitioners who almost bully others into doing their kind of yoga - particularly disabled people - hurts me.
Joanna Capello Paul: For example, in the cerebral palsy support group I am in, there have been stories of non-disabled people pushing CP folks too hard, leading to injuries that were not fully recovered - physical and emotional. And that is just not right at all. And I feel like that is part of the weird elitist attitude that shouldn't even exist with yoga practice.
Mad Miriam: OMG Joanna Capello Paul I could not agree more, as a fairly mild arthritic I get the same shit and I don't get why its so hard for some teachers to understand that just cause I got into a really low lunge last week this week my knees and hips might just be too stiff to go there and that it does not mean I am not dedicated to the practice, it means I am listening to my body, something we should all aspire to do more often.
Joanna Capello Paul: Listening to our bodies! Exactly! I don't think people like that care about listening to the body anymore. You do what YOU must do for YOUR body. And I am so burnt out on teachers who don't listen. It's why I do restorative, flow moves with my mother over the phone.
I mean, I literally cannot be straight. When I try a lunge, or a pose that requires balance, I have to ask someone, usually Adam, if my body lines up. And when he helps get me into a straight aligned line, I start wobbling. It hurts. I am in serious pain. My body, my very bones, were never going to align like that. And so I need modification, compensation, compromise. And the fact that a lot of yoga practitioners have insulted me just for that literally created a stress reaction in my brain. So when I talk about yoga poses, I have to say "modified basic yoga" otherwise I start hyperventilating just from memories.
Mad Miriam: It is a myth that our bodies and bones can align to some artificial standard, we all all have such diffent experiences and phsyologies that make up who we are and it my mind if you are making room for the breath and creating sensation, but not pain you are doing it right. I totally agree through and think it is part of the problem with the comodifying of yoga, I think once upon a time, maybe there was the root of the notion that yogis practiced to access a place beyond pain and body and to reach a space where they could meditate and focus on breath and vein, but with institutions like lululemon and power yoga people see their yoga as about perfecting the body and not reaching past the veneer that is the body. Its fascinating and sick really.
Joanna Capello Paul: I appreciate you saying that, Mad Miriam. It makes me feel better, knowing that there can't be such "perffect alignment". I was always, always told that I'd never reach any ideal pose with cerebral palsy. So I stopped. And I found isometrics and just started doing meditative stretching, which was my version of yoga anyway.
Mad Miriam: Next time someone starts to push hard ask them if they practice Ahimsa, it is the first basic principal of yoga and translates into compassion for all living things, if they say "Of course." then tell them you do as well and intimately understand what is most compassionate for your body. Namaste.
Mad Miriam: I think all the wrong people have been foisting their opinions on you. I took up Kundalini yoga last year and the whole idea of it is that through the practice you are opening up channels on your spine for the kundalini energy to come spouting out of the top of your head, I expressed concern that I had a slight scoliosis in my spine and that according to this notion I was ineligible for kudalini enlightenment, my instructor said "No worries, the energy meanders its way around these things, it's like a stream." Thus I go with that notion.
Joanna Capello Paul: Ahimsa, eh? I shall look into it!
I have fallen in love with kundalini energy. I do what your instructor says, instinctively. I don't necessarily do all the poses and moves but I reach for that energy in my own way. Maybe one day you and I could get together and practice in our own imperfect methods?

*****
Copying stuff from other social media sites can be interesting...
brightrosefox: (Default)
My darling Cara Liebowitz wrote a lovely post that I had to share:
*
"I was going to bed, I swear, but The Brooke Ellison Story is on TV. Gotta say, as cheesy and inspo-porny as it is, I love it. And on some level, I AM inspired by Brooke Ellison, mostly by her sheer determination and drive to not only succeed, but excel, not only in the face of such a life changing injury, but in the face of everyone who told her she couldn't do anything.

I don't know, I feel like maybe its different for someone with an acquired disability. For us congenital folks or those who acquired their disabilities very early on, we just go along living life the way we know how. We've never known any other way. But for folks with an acquired impairment later in life, especially one as severe as Brooke Ellison's, it requires such a radical restructuring of your life and worldviews. I am inspired by those who push through and come out the other side. I'm not so sure that's wrong.

Thoughts?"
*

I shared this because it is exactly how I feel regarding being a congenital and seeing an acquired do something dubbed "So Inspirational TM!". In the disabled community, most of us have a very strong opposition to "inspiration porn" - (the most well-known example, perhaps, being that Scott Hamilton quote and poster of Hamilton and a child both with those expensive prosthetic legs, saying 'The only disability in life is a bad" attitude" and any photo of someone in a wheelchair or crutches with a quote of "If they can do it so can you" or "What's your excuse" Fuck I hate those phrases so fucking much fuck fucking fuck - But every so often something comes along that falls into a category) that is only mildly inspo-porny and actually uplifting, even though nothing inspirational actually happens that we can see.
Like the quoted story, about a woman who becomes paralyzed and gets into a top-rate university after overcoming many challenges. Now, to people like me and Cara, with our cerebral palsy, it's like, So? That's it? What else happened? What made her so incredibly inspirational that it required a sappy movie? Why isn't there a movie about my life? I was born three months early in the late 1970s, nobody really cared about my cerebral palsy because it was mild, nobody thought I was autistic because it was the 1980s when autism was barely being looked into, I in fact had no idea of any of my invisible illnesses until I was in my late 20s... You get the idea.
Now, I have extreme respect for anyone who must go through a radical reconstruction of their identity when something like an acquired disability happens, because fucking fuck that is shattering and destructive and requires a particular rearranging of so many parts of their lives and their thinking.
There are some acquired folk who get snotty about it and either insist that everyone must "fight for a cure!" or throw themselves a public pity party and beg everyone to "find a cure!" which I can't really sympathize with.
Then again, I'm the type of cripple who embraces my cripplehood... because I have never known anything else. That may, in fact, make me seem snotty, snobby, snooty, etc.
But having a disability that permanently impairs daily life, whether congenital, acquired in very early childhood, or acquired later than childhood, changes your mindset, outlook, and indeed your soul, in ways that nobody can predict. And sometimes, you literally have to just roll with it. Limp with it. You know.
brightrosefox: (Default)
"Sometimes the only way I know how to work through something is by writing..."
Hi.

"Now I know that the number one rule to being cool is to seem unfazed, to never admit that anything scares you or impresses you or excites you. Somebody once told me it's like walking through life like this. You protect yourself from all the unexpected miseries or hurt that might show up. But I try to walk through life like this. And yes, that means catching all of those miseries and hurt, but it also means that when beautiful, amazing things just fall out of the sky, I'm ready to catch them. "

I need this. I've spent my entire life catching all of those hurts, and sometimes those hurts are beautiful and amazing - because they live inside of me. Even the painful parts. Even the Monsters. I don't always declare war on the symptoms, I often imagine myself using psychological coping mechanisms, transporting my quiet self to a Zen garden with cats and sunlight and wildflowers, as the warrior parts of my brain battle those Pain Monsters with spears and war cries. It is a mind over matter dance that does not erode the symptoms, but helps me work with and deal with them. I apply creative writing to cope and to run to other worlds in my mind.

It is seen as Positive Thinking. But I tend to flinch at that term, because it is usually followed up with a sunshine up the ass platitude. I do apply a method of positive thinking to my conditions, disorders, and disabilities. But it is my own personal method, and whenever someone tries to insist that I use a different method, I naturally stand firm and stare them down. This is why I am happy that all of my doctors, specialists, and therapists are extremely willing to help me achieve my own positive thinking, because it is my own, and I know exactly what I want from it.
Unfortunately, it also makes me extremely vulnerable to criticism. I am probably Doing It Wrong. I am probably Wanting To Be Chronically Ill All The Time. I am probably Magically Convincing Myself That I Am Getting Worse. I Obviously Am Not Thinking Positively Enough - because my biggest coping mechanism is to write it down, and to share my newest findings with people I love and with people who understand my situation. At least, those are my assumptions. I made a few poor assumptions and lost a few acquaintances. But I moved on. Now, I am still writing, still speaking out. Now, I am determined to hold on to my personal method of positive thinking no matter who tries to change that method.

That is why I love this message from Sarah Kay. No one else can work inside my mind like I can. Each of us has the power to think positively in a way that works for us and us alone.

The next time somebody tells you that you need to stop doing it This way and start doing it That way, think long and hard about it before you even reply. Some things are just not worth debating. Sometimes all you can do is smile and nod and say "Thank you for the advice" - and move on. It is your mind, after all.

http://dotsub.com/view/e8f7d701-e410-464d-9051-eeae8a1ddd44/viewTranscript/eng

http://www.upworthy.com/watch-the-ted-talk-that-inspired-two-standing-ovations?g=2

I will probably listen to this video enough to memorize or recite most of it, and my poor memory will do its best to hold it close.
brightrosefox: (Default)
You know those migraines that last several days and are low-level enough that you can do things but are still horrendous enough that you can barely brain due to pain?
This is compounded by more hemiparesis, more fibromyalgia flaring, more knee pain (both chondromalacia and notarthritisdamnit in the right knee), TMJ, neck tension, and hypertonia in my left hand. Cerebral palsy and its complexities = buckets of fun.
The cats are less stressed than I am. I don't even know why I am stressed. There is no point. I'm not the one moving the house around. I'm not the one repairing and replacing the kitchen. I'm getting exactly what I want with the kitchen/hallway floor, cabinets, stove, dishwasher, etc. Next week is going to be like camping out upstairs and using the living room as a mini kitchen until the handymen are ready to replace the carpet. I keep telling myself it will all be fun and awesome. My amygdala is yelling, "You are a cat! You don't like change! You get anxious when stuff gets moved around, because your neutral chaos is suddenly not where it was and you can't find anything!" and the amygdala has a very good point.
Meditative exercises are in order, and clonazepam, and such.
People on Facebook are still irritating me with the whole "Big Pharma is EVIL and all pharmaceuticals are POISON and also the greatest cure is medical cannabis!" I mean, I can't wait until Maryland allows for medical cannabis to be a Thing, so I can become a patient. However, I am not going to bash traditional Western medicine like that. Lives have been saved. Fuck you, ultra hippie holistic pushers. I wouldn't be alive to listen to your ranting if traditional Big Pharma hadn't been around the NICU in 1979. I'm all about holistic medicine balancing out pharmaceutical medicine. But there is only so much I can take from extremists on either side.
Funny, because one of my favorite current quotes - found on Facebook - is "The is a huge amount of freedom that comes to you when you take nothing personally." Unfortunately, since we are humans, this is easier said than done. I'm not a robot. I'm also an empath. When I feel insulted and slighted, I do feel the need to at least correct the person. You know, like when someone tells me I am filling my body with Evil Big Pharma's poison, when that poison is the best thing keeping me from falling into a seizure-induced coma or death; or the best thing keeping me from self harm from deep depressions; or the best thing keeping me from endlessly screaming wildly in constant violent crippling agony that I cannot describe. Supplements and therapies can do a great deal, but they cannot do what Evil Big Pharma drugs do for me. So, yeah. I don't mind being in the clutches of Evil if it helps me live my life well.
I try to not take things personally. It does free me from stress. It is easy to smile, nod, and brush off insults like nothing. Sometimes. But, look, we all have those days when everything is piling on us, our moods are dark and growling, we want to bite everyone who looks at us wrong. I don't care if you're a bodhisattva - human emotion runs wild. And that means that if someone keeps trying to push me, I will eventually keep throwing them off a cliff until they get the point.
brightrosefox: (Default)
Be like water
Perhaps if I had seen this last night, I would not have had my panic attack this morning.
As it were, everything will be fine, when Adam comes home on Friday. The leak in the upstairs bathroom floor dripping into the ceiling onto the downstairs hallway floor will be fixed. The ceiling will be repaired by a very knowledgable husband. And everyone in the house will be reminded, and remember (myself included), to turn off all the shower faucets completely and tightly after showering, otherwise the leaking will continue. If I have to I will put a plastic container in the corner by the tub to catch any water that splashes out so it doesn't drip on the floor and especially into that corner.
I also need to take a few deep breaths, maybe some ashwagandha and theanine.
All will be well.

All is well. All is well. All is well.
Turn tape over
All is well. All is well.
(And anyone who gets that reference gets a cookie)

It is going to be 114 degrees today. No kidding. That's the heat index for Washington DC. They claim the actual temperature will be 101, but I don't believe them. I wish I'd remembered my hat.
At least our AC works just fine.
brightrosefox: (Default)
Be like water
Perhaps if I had seen this last night, I would not have had my panic attack this morning.
As it were, everything will be fine, when Adam comes home on Friday. The leak in the upstairs bathroom floor dripping into the ceiling onto the downstairs hallway floor will be fixed. The ceiling will be repaired by a very knowledgable husband. And everyone in the house will be reminded, and remember (myself included), to turn off all the shower faucets completely and tightly after showering, otherwise the leaking will continue. If I have to I will put a plastic container in the corner by the tub to catch any water that splashes out so it doesn't drip on the floor and especially into that corner.
I also need to take a few deep breaths, maybe some ashwagandha and theanine.
All will be well.

All is well. All is well. All is well.
Turn tape over
All is well. All is well.
(And anyone who gets that reference gets a cookie)

It is going to be 114 degrees today. No kidding. That's the heat index for Washington DC. They claim the actual temperature will be 101, but I don't believe them. I wish I'd remembered my hat.
At least our AC works just fine.
brightrosefox: (Default)
Be like water
Perhaps if I had seen this last night, I would not have had my panic attack this morning.
As it were, everything will be fine, when Adam comes home on Friday. The leak in the upstairs bathroom floor dripping into the ceiling onto the downstairs hallway floor will be fixed. The ceiling will be repaired by a very knowledgable husband. And everyone in the house will be reminded, and remember (myself included), to turn off all the shower faucets completely and tightly after showering, otherwise the leaking will continue. If I have to I will put a plastic container in the corner by the tub to catch any water that splashes out so it doesn't drip on the floor and especially into that corner.
I also need to take a few deep breaths, maybe some ashwagandha and theanine.
All will be well.

All is well. All is well. All is well.
Turn tape over
All is well. All is well.
(And anyone who gets that reference gets a cookie)

It is going to be 114 degrees today. No kidding. That's the heat index for Washington DC. They claim the actual temperature will be 101, but I don't believe them. I wish I'd remembered my hat.
At least our AC works just fine.

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